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    About

    The Queensway – Humber Bay, known officially as Stonegate-Queensway, is a neighbourhood in the south-west of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It is located in the south-east of the former City of Etobicoke....

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    This neighbourhood originally centred on the intersection of Lake Shore Boulevard and The Queensway near the mouth of the Humber River, however that intersection disappeared with the building of the Queen Elizabeth Way. The area to the south of the Gardiner Expressway is today part of Mimico neighbourhood. Today, the neighbourhood is composed of two areas which overlap at the former intersection:

    This community is mainly made up of 1950s era low-rise apartment buildings and an old turn-of-the century market garden community was absorbed by the city as it grew. There is little traffic, and the only amenities in the area are in the Stonegate Plaza, which include delis, dollar stores, a pharmacy, a laundromat, and a Valu-Mart. The southeast portion of the neighbourhood is relatively low-rent, with a high population of European immigrants.

    History

    The Queensway – Humber Bay, known officially as Stonegate-Queensway, is a neighbourhood in the south-west of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It is located in the south-east of the former City of Etobicoke....

    Read More

    Neighbourhood

    This neighbourhood originally centred on the intersection of Lake Shore Boulevard and The Queensway near the mouth of the Humber River, however that intersection disappeared with the building of the Queen Elizabeth Way. The area to the south of the Gardiner Expressway is today part of Mimico neighbourhood. Today, the neighbourhood is composed of two areas which overlap at the former intersection:

    • The Queensway: It extends north from the Gardiner Expressway south of Norseman street. There is a residential area in the centre-east with industrial land and new big box stores further to the west.
    • Sunnylea / Stonegate: formerly the 'Humber' postal village it originally referred to the area around the old intersection of what is now the Queensway and what is now Lake Shore Boulevard at the Humber River. It is now mostly to the north of The Queensway, a residential area with few bridges between the Mimico Creek and the Humber River from Lake Ontario north to Glenroy Avenue (south of Park Lawn cemetery). There is little commercial in this area except along portions of The Queensway and a small amount on Berry Rd.

    Character

    This community is mainly made up of 1950s era low-rise apartment buildings and an old turn-of-the century market garden community was absorbed by the city as it grew. There is little traffic, and the only amenities in the area are in the Stonegate Plaza, which include delis, dollar stores, a pharmacy, a laundromat, and a Valu-Mart. The southeast portion of the neighbourhood is relatively low-rent, with a high population of European immigrants.

    Most streets formerly south of The Queensway east of the Mimico Creek were lost when the QEW was built however, along the waterfront a new street has been built on largely artificial shoreline named Marine Parade after a similar 1890s street planned to run along Mimico's shoreline. Some streets laid out in developments for returning soldiers carry names commemorating military men such as: Hornell (war hero born in Mimico), Saunders, Clive and Cochrane (formerly Churchill). Other streets laid out in the following years celebrate the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II such as: The Queensway and Lillibet Rd. Many streets in the Stonegate neighbourhood north of Berry Road are entirely new, such as: Sunnydale, Kinsdale and Heatherdale.

    History

    King's Mill Reserve

    After the fall of New France to the British, a French trader and first Toronto settler M. Rousseau received permission from the British administration to settle with his family on the site of the second French Fort in Toronto (at the foot of the Humber River). When the Simcoes arrived from Newark (Niagara-on-the-Lake) with several hundred Queen's Rangers (Loyalist soldiers), M. Rousseau guided the ships into Toronto Bay (now Toronto Inner Harbour). John Graves Simcoe renamed the Toronto River the Humber after the Humber River in England. When land in the area was surveyed and divided into lots, the area on both side of the Humber River was reserved by the government for timber and M. Rousseau was offered land on the west (Etobicoke) side in what is now the Humber Bay neighbourhood. M. Rousseau refused to relocate from one side of the river and he left to resettle near Hamilton where he was given land in compensation. The Kings Mill Reserve was that part of the original forest that covered Toronto that was preserved rather than cleared for farms. The Kings Mill (Old Mill) is at Bloor north of this neighbourhood but the reserve stretched south to what is now the Queensway covering most of modern Humber Bay's residential district. The Kings Mill reserve was commemorated in this neighbourhood by the Kitzler Vocational Collegiate (now Bishop Allen Academy) which was actually on the west side of the Mimico Creek in The Queensway.

    Early Hotels on the Lake Shore

    Etobicoke's first highway was Dundas Street (Toronto to the town of Dundas beside Hamilton) but for most early settlers of southern Etobicoke an Indian path along the shoreline given the name Lake Road (Lake Shore Boulevard West) was found to be a more convenient street. This street extended into Toronto from where Queen street stopped at the bottom of Keele St (Parkside) around the top of Humber Bay to the border of Etobicoke (the Humber River) where it met with the extension of Queen Street in Etobicoke (Stock's Side Road). As bridges were only built on Ontario's important highways at first (Dundas St, Kingston Rd., Yonge St.) a ferry was operated at the end of the Humber River. After the first bridge was built at the end of the Humber and a toll opened (to pay for the bridge), the intersection here became the first community in Etobicoke south of Dundas centring on three early Hotels and a wharf. North of this area were government reserves (forest left intact for lumber). There was also a notable jog in what would become Royal York where it meets the Mimico Creek crossing the creek to the east where there remains a footbridge today just north of Norseman St., north on today's Humbervale Boulevard and back west along what is now Glenroy Avenue. In 1855 Ontario's first railway the Grand Trunk Railway's line between Hamilton and Toronto was built through southern Humber Bay between Lake Shore and Stock's Side Road (the Queensway) passing over the latter just west of the intersection of these streets at the Humber River. A 'Humber Station' is marked between Lake Shore and Stock's Side Road (The Queensway) near the intersection and a 'Grove Stop' is marked where the railway passes over Salisbury (Park Lawn) into what became Mimico in the 1850s.

    Subdivision

    In 1883, Mr. Davidson, a businessman from the United States, imported about 40 small prefabricated houses most of which were placed on Davidson Crescent (now gone) between Stock's Side Rd (The Queensway) and Lake Shore which formed a small artistic community. A subdivision plan was also prepared that year for residential streets north of the future The Queensway. In the 1890 subdivision of Mimico Humber Bay was still shown as being within that growing village. By 1926, the area between Lake Shore, Stock's Side Rd (the Queensway) and Salisbury (Park Lawn) was subdivided with a number of homes being built on the last street. Some homes had also been built on the south side along the Lake Shore between the Humber and Salisbury (Park Lawn). Several of the first churches and the first school use Davidson Houses. At the intersection of Lake Shore and what would become The Queensway, the Lake Shore streetcar line was built through with its own bridge and a camping ground was set up by one of the old hotels. The Humber Bay School and the St. James Anglican Church moved out of Davidson houses when new buildings were built on High Street in the subdivision north of what would become the Queensway. Humber Bay became a Postal District. More churches were soon built in Humber Bay including a LDS Church. By about 1890 Humber Bay became a postal village with the opening of the Humber Bay Post Office on the south side of what would become the Queensway between Davidson Crescent and the intersection with Lake Shore.

    Pre War Years

    With the advent of the car the area changed beyond recognition. At the intersection of Lake Shore and the future Queensway, the wharf into lake Ontario was replaced with a Dance Hall on a Pier called the Palace Pier, modelled after the Brighton Pier in England. The land south of Lake Shore along the shoreline was filled with motels for motorists arriving in Toronto along the Toronto-Hamilton Highway (Lake Shore). North of what would become the Queensway between the subdivision and the Humber a Golf Course was built and further north around Glenroy Avenue a school was built named Sunnylea in a competition. Along the Queensway many single storey homes were built. Just before the Second World War the first lighted limited access highway in North America connecting Hamilton with Toronto, the Queen Elizabeth Way, was opened. This replaced the Lake Shore as the major highway to the west of Toronto but it's Toronto end with the large QEW monument was at the intersection of the Queensway and Lake Shore. The building of the QEW involved the demolition of many of the buildings between the future Queensway and Lake Shore and cut off the 'Motel Strip' from the Humber Bay neighbourhood to the north. West of Mimico Creek the Highway cut the Queensway off from Mimico. The old intersection at the future Queensway and Lake Shore disappeared. Although the other Etobicoke neighbourhoods along the Lake Shore left Etobicoke in this period, the splitting of the Humber Bay neighbourhood by the QEW prevented this neighbourhood from developing into a separate municipality.

    Post War years

    In 1952 Etobicoke left York County with the other municipalities south of Steeles Ave to join the new Metropolitan Toronto which began to urbanise the townships around Toronto like Etobicoke. In 1946 the 'Queensway' post office opened and at the Queensway and Royal York a development of 'veterans houses' was built for returning servicemen. In the 1950s, Toronto was expanding and Queen Street West was extended from the foot of Roncesvalles Avenue around the top of Humber Bay north of the Railway tracks complementing the Lake Shore to the south and linking with the former Stock's Side Road. With the accession of Queen Elizabeth in 1952 this street was named The Queensway also to be consistent with Queen Street t

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